When I started this exercise, I had never heard of Dillinger or Markdown syntax, so this was the first time I have ever created a markdown file to format plain text. I used the guidelines from Sarah Simpkin The Programming Historian. I had issues because I found the examples on the Programming Historian page did not specify where spaces should and should not go when entering URL in markdown to get reference style links and in text images. Which made a difference when trying to get links and images to show on dillinger properly. So I had to play around with it a bit to get the links to turn out how I needed them to. As for the images, I was entering the URL in the correct format but the dillinger page was not showing my images, instead it showed a box with the name I had given my images.

I spoke to my classmate Catherine Hood and she suggested that I use Google images, and told me that I may not have been getting the proper Image URL from Flickr, and instead I was getting the URL for the Flickr page. I’m glad I mentioned my issue to her because she was right, and the Google images worked perfectly. I’m happy with how my first document with Markdown came out. I enjoyed this Dillinger exercise, it is a straightforward way to learn how to write in Markdown, as the website shows you the text in Markdown on one side, and the Preview for the plain text in real time on the other. This way you can get a clear understanding of how the Markdown format will appear once you are finished.

 

image

Also, Markdown is very useful for creating legible files in plain text which can then be transferred and styled in other platforms. Once my file was completed, I copied the Markdown text and entered it into Notational Velocity, which is my note taking software. From there I was able to create an Open-Notebook- repository on GitHub, and add my Markdown document there under a new file name.